January 15, 2013

This takes me back to my days with a teeny tiny flower press, marveling at the fragile and delicate dried and pressed flowers that even I, an entirely ham-fisted child, could somehow produce. But of course this project has a far more serious goal in mind—to document and barcode every plant in existence. I love the spirit and soul of this project—and Ellen Jorgensen, of the Brooklyn-based biohacking lab Genspace, is a rockstar.

July 5, 2012
Tracking the birth and life of Anonymous, anthropologist and academic Gabriella Coleman set out to explain the mysterious group in her talk at TEDGlobal. The answer was less than comprehensive, but given the nature of the beast, that’s not particularly surprising. She came up with four ways to describe the group’s makeup:
Anonymous scales and is participatory; it is not just hackers. 
Anonymous may seem chaotic, but most targets are not random. 
They put on a good performance, obvious even to their detractors. 
They are visible and invisible. 
Read the full post here. For bonus points, read also Quinn Norton's excellent Wired piece, How Anonymous Picks Targets, Launches Attacks, and Takes Powerful Organizations Down, which covers much of the same ground but in rather more detail than Coleman could include in a TEDTalk (or, for that matter, than I could capture in a live blog.)

[Photo c/o James Duncan Davidson; Graphics c/o TED.]

Tracking the birth and life of Anonymous, anthropologist and academic Gabriella Coleman set out to explain the mysterious group in her talk at TEDGlobal. The answer was less than comprehensive, but given the nature of the beast, that’s not particularly surprising. She came up with four ways to describe the group’s makeup:

  1. Anonymous scales and is participatory; it is not just hackers. 
  2. Anonymous may seem chaotic, but most targets are not random. 
  3. They put on a good performance, obvious even to their detractors. 
  4. They are visible and invisible. 
Read the full post here. For bonus points, read also Quinn Norton's excellent Wired piece, How Anonymous Picks Targets, Launches Attacks, and Takes Powerful Organizations Down, which covers much of the same ground but in rather more detail than Coleman could include in a TEDTalk (or, for that matter, than I could capture in a live blog.)
[Photo c/o James Duncan Davidson; Graphics c/o TED.]

November 29, 2011
"To them it’s junk. To us, probably the vitals of our next robot."

So speaks Ricky Ng-Adam, partner and project generator of Xienchejian, a non-profit hackerspace in Shanghai that thrives on donations from community members. Hackerspaces in China details how the Shanghai Government Technology Committee has issued a call for 100 more community hackerspaces, offering government funding for equipment. I’m sure spare parts will still be welcome.

[Story via Noah Raford.]